Tag: Iraq

War Crimes Part 12 – Moira’s Story

Blown Periphery, Going Postal
This is fiction. Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental. The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred. Some of the locations are real.

Like most of the important milestones in Edge’s life his marriage was in the autumn, October 14th of 2000 is St John the Baptist Church Instow. It was and is a beautiful church, nestled into the gentle folds of the hills above the estuary of the Rivers Taw and Torridge. Moira Tremain and Mark Edge were married at 13:00 under a glowering sky and predictably it rained all afternoon. He was smart in his No 2s, a Sergeant now with a Military Cross adding to his impressive tally of medals. Nobody asked him and he felt no need to publicise it. Moira knew and she also knew the toll on his mental health being awarded that medal had cost him.
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War Crimes Part 11 – Moira’s Story

This is fiction. Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental. The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred. Some of the locations are real.

When Angela found Moira it was obvious that Moira had been crying. Her dark mascara had run from her eyes in blue streaks and those eyes were puffy and reddened. Even her hair looked slightly dull and listless, as though the spark had gone to be replaced with self-indulgent misery. She was sitting on the loading bay, pretending to smoke a cigarette. Moira was drawing in with a huge suck, the cigarette end glowing like the tip of an inquisitor’s poker, then she let out the smoke in gentle puffs, because it was obviously too hot for her oral membranes. Inhaling was out of the question.
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War Crimes Part 10 – SERE and the RAF Loadmaster’s Story

Blown Periperphy, Going Postal
This is fiction.  Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental.  The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred.  Some of the locations are real. 

The Nimrod MR4A had been replaced by a USAF Rivet Joint flying out of Incirlik in Turkey.  The updated Boeing 707 was in a gentle holding pattern, 35,000 feet above Falluja.  It was monitoring cell phone traffic and tens of thousands of bytes of data could be processed every few seconds, the sensors’ electronic brains programmed to detect certain key words and phrases.  CIA trained interpreters would listen in to calls of interest.

Three consoles down towards the less glamorous rear of the aircraft, signals from two Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) suddenly appeared and were beamed back to the aircraft from a geostationary satellite over the Persian Gulf, one of many.  The USAF Master Sergeant zoomed in her console to show Basra City and the surrounding waterways.  She notified her supervisor.

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The Relevance of Christianity – Part One

Jonathon Davies, Going Postal
Saint Pepe of Kekistan. 6th Century Byzantine school.

The State of Affairs

According to the 2011 census, Christians make up 59.5% of the UK population. Those with no religion make up 25.7%. Then you have Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Judaism and Buddhism. Anglicans make up the majority of Christians, followed by Catholics like myself (I regard the current Pope as a cuck who should be removed from office). Church attendances have been falling, while Islam has been increasing. The media (we all know who) constantly assault the church and Christian faith. This was seen with the various hatchet jobs on Jacob Rees-Mogg for saying what he believed in. Nothing is sacred any longer, except Islam. People have fallen out of love with Christianity, and now turn to the internet for salvation. Men can become women, women can become men. It seems anyone can marry almost anything. We appear to be culturally cast adrift, and morals are breaking down all around us. Almost anything goes. The news no longer shocks. We have seen people die live on T.V. What more is there? For many, science is the new religion, the new God.

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War Crimes Part 9 – The RAF Loadmaster’s Story

Blown Periphery, Going Postal
This is fiction. Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental. The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred. Some of the locations are real.

The aircraft movements woke him again, specifically a Nimrod MR4A blasting off at 10:00 hrs to commence its eighteen hour patrol, hoovering up electronic intelligence with its 90 antennae. The Nimrod turned north and began the long, cyclic patrol above Iraq, data pouring in from the sensors like Wiltshire Police’s monitoring of 16-year-olds’ Twitter accounts.

Gilmore knew that further sleep was impossible, so he chugged half a bottle of water and headed for the Gym. It was a large, well-appointed and air conditioned luxury and one of the few benefits of being on Ops along with the food. He plugged himself into an MP3 player and listened to the Lightning Seeds’ upbeat and cheerful ditties. He had run five miles and was halfway through a forty minute stint on the cross-trainer, when he became aware someone was lurking just behind his right shoulder, so he paused and turned round. It was his little friend, the MT driver.

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War Crimes Part 8 – The RAF Loadmaster’s Story

Blown Periphery, Going Postal
This is fiction. Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental. The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred. Some of the locations are real. The BBC is of course a national treasure because of the unique way it is funded.

Gilmore woke up around 12:00 because he was too hot and the continual aircraft movements made sleep impossible. He went to the ablutions corimec and pampered himself with an enormous piss followed by a Basra shower. Water was a premium in this part of the world, expensive and time consuming to desalinate, then ship into the base by tanker. So the British military had a standard operating procedure for taking a shower:

  1. Enter shower cubicle and turn on the water. The water will run for no more than 20 seconds. During this time you must ensure all bodily parts are thoroughly wet. Do not ingest water.
  2. Turn off the water. Select shower gel, soap or myrrh scented oils of choice and thoroughly lather the entire body. Avoid contact with the eyes.
  3. Turn on the water and rinse off cleansing agents for a maximum of 40 seconds ensuring all residues are removed, to prevent chemical irritation.
  4. At this point Male personnel are to shave. This stage is optional for female personnel.
  5. Ensure all sensitive body areas are well moisturised because the highly chlorinated water is likely to irritate sensitive skin to buggery.

The combined messing facility was getting busy when he piled his body armour and helmet by the door. If the rocket and mortar alarm were to go off, a stampede of around 200 people would rush to find their kit among the piles of identically camouflaged personal protective equipment. Some tube had made a decree that body armour was not to be worn in the combined messing facility, so that was it. Gilmore elected to have a freshly cooked ham and tomato omelette with French beans and found a quiet corner of the mess hall to sit. There was no sign of Flight Lieutenant Mount or Flying Officer Skelton.

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War Crimes Part 7 – The RAF Loadmaster’s Story

Blown Periphery, Going Postal
This is fiction. Any resemblance to any persons living or dead is coincidental. The events outlined have never to my knowledge occurred. Some of the locations are real.

Son of a gun
You walked into the party like you were walking onto a yacht
Your hat strategically dipped below one eye
Your scarf it was apricot
You had one eye in the mirror as you watched yourself gavotte
And all the girls dreamed that they’d be your partner they’d be your partner and

You’re so vain
You probably think this song is about you

You’re so vain (you’re so vain)
I bet you think this song is about you
Don’t you don’t you?

Carly Simon

Just before midnight on a late October evening in 2005, a Puma helicopter took off from Basra Air Station (BAS) and headed north. The aircraft showed no lights, a contrast to the city passing on its starboard side and the gas and oil separation plants (GOSPs) in the desert that were lit up like Christmas trees. Once clear of the city, the helicopter swung right and picked up the River Tigris that wound its convoluted path through the desert, southeast towards the Persian Gulf. The Puma was heading in the opposite direction, north-northwest towards Maysan Province.

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The War In Iraq 1941, Part Three

Harried by Churchill, Wavell instructed Major-General Clark, temporary commander in Palestine, to assemble a column. It was to be known as “Habforce” with the orders to relieve the RAF base at Habbaniya. It was very much an ad-hoc unit, cobbled together from any formations that could be spared or found. The military units in Palestine had already been denuded by the requirement to support British operations in Greece and Crete. To say that General Wavell wasn’t exactly brimming with confidence was something of an understatement. He cabled London:

Very doubtful whether above force strong enough to relieve Habbaniya or whether Habbaniya can prolong resistance till its arrival. I am afraid I can only regard it as an outside chance…

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The War In Iraq 1941, Part Two

Blown Periphery, Going Postal

The Siege of RAF Habbaniya

The arrival of the second convoy at Basra caused the Iraqi leadership considerable panic. Rashid Ali continued to pester his newly-found Axis allies for financial and military aid. Specifically, he asked the Germans for captured British weaponry as the Iraqi army was familiar with and had trained on British weapons. The British Ambassador in Baghdad Sir Kinahan Cornwallis, had sent communications to Rashid Ali that Iraqi forces should immediately stop any aggression against British forces in the country and honour the terms of the Anglo-Iraq treaty. Baghdad was now a hostile city and on 29th April 1941, Cornwallis decided to evacuate non-essential British nationals from the Capital to Habbaniya.

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The War In Iraq 1941, Part One

Blown Periphery, Going Postal

The battle for oil and survival

By 1941, Britain and her Dominions were fighting alone against the Axis forces. The U-Boat menace was gathering impetus in the Atlantic and the Army was fighting Rommel’s Africa Corps in the Western Desert and German and Italian forces in Greece. While we remember operations such as Battleaxe, Crusader and the battles for Tobruk and El Alamein, the War in Iraq seems strangely forgotten. But the battles of Basra, Habbaniya, Fallujah and Baghdad were as important and perhaps more so. If Iraq had fallen, the British ability to wage total war would have been compromised, because modern warfare is totally reliant in a secure and sufficient supply of oil.

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